Pharmaceutical Industries and Education in India

Pharmaceutical Industries and Education in India

Learning objectives

At the end of this lecture, the student will be able to:

Explain the growth of pharmaceutical industries in India

Discuss the growth of pharmaceutical eduaction in India

The Indian Pharmaceutical Industry

}  The Indian pharmaceuticals industry has grown from a mere $0.3billion in 1980, to $12 billion in 2012.

}  Branded generics dominate the market, making up 70-80% of it.

}  The local companies enjoy a dominant position due to their development capabilities and early investment, as from 1970 to 2005, Indian law only recognized process patents and not product patents, which many companies took advantage of.

}   The price of drugs is very low, due to intense competition. While India is 10th globally in terms of value, it is 3rd in term of volume of drugs produced.

The Indian Set-Up

}  The Indian pharmaceutical sector is highly fragmented, with more than 20,000 registered companies, with the top 250 companies controlling 70% of the market. These companies can currently meet about 70% of the countries demands for drugs; this is mainly through the Maharashtra and Gujarat regions, which account for 45% of the total number of pharmaceutical manufacturing units in India.

SWOT Analysis of Indian Pharmaceutical Industry

Strengths

Weaknesses

Opportunities

Threats

       Low cost  skilled manpower

       Access to large pool of highly trained scientists

       Strong marketing and distribution network

       Proven track record in design of high technology manufacturing devices

       Low cost of innovation, manufacturing and operations

       Stringent pricing regulations

       Poor transport and medical infrastructure

       Lack of data protection

        Competitive environment

       Poor health insurance coverage

       Production of low quality drugs tarnishes image of industry abroad

       Low investment in innovative R&D

       Increase in per capita income

       Global demand for generics rising

       Increasing population with more inactive lifestyle

       Increasing health insurance sector

       Significant investment from MNCs

       Medical tourism

       Cheap, diverse clinical trials

       Global outsourcing hub due to low cost of skilled labor

       Other low cost countries affecting demand

       Government regulations  ever changing

       Expanding of Drugs Price Control Order

       Lack of investment in infrastructure

       Wage inflation

       R&D restricted by lack of animal testing and outdated patient office

       Counterfeiting threat

Growth Factors for Indian Market

}  Population Growth

}  Socio Economic Changes and Urbanization

}  Increasing acceptability of modern medicine

}  More affordable drugs

}  More accessibility to drugs and medical care

}  Cheap production cost

}  Government regulations targeting growth and competitive market

}  Contract R&D

}  Medical Tourism

Key Players

Company

Net Sales (30th July 2013 $Bn)

Employees

Cipla

1.39

20,000

Dr Reddy’s Laboratories

1.14

16,300

Ranbaxy Labs

1.07

14,600

Aurobindo Pharma

0.92

8,635

Lupin Ltd

0.91

11,355

Sun Pharma

0.68

11,200

Novartis India

0.14

4,500 (115,000 Worldwide)


International Players

Company

Net Sales (2012 $ Bn)

Employees

Johnson & Johnson (USA)

67.2

117,000

Pfizer (USA)

58.9

91,000

Novartis (Switzerland)

56.7

115,000

Roche (Switzerland)

47.8

80,000

Merck (USA)

47.3

86,000

Sanofi (French)

46.4

113,000

GlaxoSmithKline (UK)

39.9

97,000

Pharmacy Education

Early Pharmacy Education

Ø   1860 – Madras Medical College – Method of making up prescriptions and compounding – 2 year Diploma in Pharmacy

Ø  1937- Andhra University, Visakhapatnam

Ø   Compounder Courses in Bengal, Mumbai, UP

Modern Pharmacy Education

Ø   1934 – BHU, Varanasi – B.Pharm – Prof. M.L. Schroff – Father of Modern Pharmacy Education in India

Ø   Andhra University, Visakhapatnam

Ø  Nagpur University

Ø   Madras Medical College

Ø   Dept. of Chemical Technology, University of Bombay

Ø  Punjab University

Ø  BITS, Pilani

Ø  University of Saugar

Post Graduate Pharmacy Education

Ø   1940 – BHU, Varanasi – M.Pharm

Ø   Andhra University, Visakhapatnam

Ø  Nagpur University

Ø   Madras Medical College

Ø   Dept. of Chemical Technology, University of Bombay

Ø  Punjab University

Ø  BITS, Pilani

Ø  University of Saugar

Ø  S.M.S. Medical College Jaipur

Ø   L.M. College of Pharmacy, Ahmedabad

Present Scenario in Pharmacy Education

Ø   D.PHARM

Ø   M.PHARM

Ø   PHARM.D

Ø   PHARM.D – POST BACCLAURATE

Ø   Ph.D

Regulatory Bodies in Pharmacy Education

v   Pharmacy Council of India (PCI)

v   All India Council for Technical Education (AICTE)

Research Institutes

National Institute of Pharmaceutical Education and Research (NIPER)

Ø   Mohali

Ø   Hyderabad

Ø  Rae Bareilly

Ø   Guwahati

Ø   Ahmedabad

Ø   Hajipur

Ø   Kolkatta

Future institutes

National Institute of Pharmaceutical Education and Research, Visakhapatnam

National Institute of Pharmaceutical Education and Research, Nagpur

National Institute of Pharmaceutical Education and Research, Jhalawar

National Institute of Pharmaceutical Education and Research, Chhattisgarh

National Institute of Pharmaceutical Education and Research, Thiruvananthapuram

Career Options for Pharmacists

Ø   Research & Development - Chemist/Chemical Engineer/Pharmacologist: In new drug discovery, Process development, F&D,Clinical Trials, Bioequivalance study,Toxicological study, analytical testing

Ø   Production & Manufacturing  - Production &Analytical Chemist/Q.C.Chemist/Q.A.Officer

Ø   Marketing - Marketing Exec.- M.R. involve in pharma sales & supply.

Retail &Hospital Pharmacy - In dispensing & store magt.

Ø   Academic - Faculty in pharmacy institute involve in teaching, training & research

Ø   Regulatory - In Govt. &Private sector involve in DRA,IPR such as copy right, trademarks etc

Ø   Clinical Trials – Pharmacovigilance, drug safety associate, medical writing, medical coding

Summary

}  The local companies enjoy a dominant position due to their development capabilities and early investment, as from 1970 to 2005, Indian law only recognized process patents and not product patents

}   The price of drugs is very low, due to intense competition. While India is 10th globally in terms of value, it is 3rd in term of volume of drugs produced

}  Population Growth

}  Socio Economic Changes and Urbanization

}  Increasing acceptability of modern medicine

}  More affordably drugs

}  More accessibility to drugs and medical care

}  Cheap production cost

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